He's a Perfect Little Gentleman - The Swine! Ronald Frankau.
He's a Perfect Little Gentleman - The Swine!
He's a Perfect Little Gentleman - The Swine!
He's a Perfect Little Gentleman - The Swine!

He's a Perfect Little Gentleman - The Swine!

Tayler, Laurie. Soft Cover. London: Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd., no date (circa 1940). 1st Edition. Very Good.


First edition. Illustrated by Laurie Tayler. Publisher's pictorial white paper wrappers, with an illustration of a haloed Hitler in front of a red pig silhouette to the front wrapper, lettered in black. Very good, with some light wear to the extremities, minor soiling and light creasing to the wrappers, faint vertical crease to the otherwise fresh pages. A bright piece of WWII ephemera. He's a Perfect Little Gentleman is a humorous wartime poem by English comedian Ronald Frankau that satirizes Hitler's "gentlemanly" perception in spite of his imperialist actions. For example, Frankau writes: "When 'friendship pacts' he franks / He's so imbued / with gratitude/ he'll send a t'ousand t'anks." Throughout the volume, Hitler is portrayed as a hog with a swastika branded on to his flank. - with - [Unknown illustrator. United Kingdom, circa 1941.] Hand-drawn illustration of pigs transforming into Adolf Hitler. Single sheet of thin white paper, drawing in black ink. Unfolded, the illustration is of four pigs, with fold lines and the text "FOLD AS INDICATED TO FIND THE BIGGEST OF ALL". When folded on the dotted lines, the image "transforms" into the face of Adolf Hitler. Very good, with two small holes and a small bit of tape (not needed, however, the tape isn't mending anything, it's just there.) This is a hand-drawn copy of a piece of propaganda created by the British Embassy around February 1941. Specifically, it was disseminated in Europe and Iraq, sometimes plane-dropped by the Royal Air Force, in an effort to quell pro-German sentiment. A similar image of four jackals transforming into Mussolini was created and dispersed. Depictions of Hitler as a pig in political cartoons and propaganda were common after the National Socialist Party came to power in Germany. The Hitler/swine reference originated earlier though, and even within his own party. In an effort to garner more support for Hitler across wider audiences, the Nazi propaganda machine portrayed him as an esteemed soldier during the First World War, bravely shuttling messages between battalions in the trenches. Letters and documents from Hitler's own WWI regiment have dispelled this myth, however, showing that Hitler was referred to as "etappenschweine." Translated as "rear-area pig," this indicates that his role as a messenger actually allowed for him to be several kilometers back behind the first front. [Weber, Thomas. Hitler's First War. Oxford University Press, 2011.].


Item #WWII002

Price: $250.00