Item #RF070 A Masque of Reason. Robert Frost.
A Masque of Reason

A Masque of Reason

Price: $2,000.00

Hard Cover. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1945. Near Fine / Dust Jacket Included.

First edition, first printing. Signed and inscribed by Frost on front free endpaper, with a holograph of his poem, "Bravado": "Bravado / Have I not walked without an upward look / Of caution under stars that very well / Might not have missed me when they shot and fell? / It was a risk I had to take - and took. / Robert Frost / For Stanley Brightwell / 1946." Publisher's navy boards, with spine lettered in gilt; in the original pictorial dust jacket, with a drawing of a desert and fire-ball attributed to "Palacias," lettered in black, with portrait of Frost to rear panel. Near fine book, with light rubbing to spine ends and corners of boards, small bookseller's label affixed to front free endpaper, and a hint of soiling to top right of half-title page; in a near fine dust jacket, unclipped, with light toning to spine, light wear to spine ends, bright and clean panels, and lightly nicked corners. Overall, a beautiful copy, with a one-of-a-kind inscription. Crane A27.1. A Masque of Reason is a short, comedic play that marks a thematic departure from Frost's previous works. An examination of the relationship between God and man written in blank verse, the text purports to be the 43rd chapter of the Book of Job from the Bible, which only has 42 chapters. In 1947, Frost published the sequel to this play, A Masque of Mercy, which touches on the same theme. Notably, A Masque of Reason was published on the occasion of Frost's 70th birthday, with the subsequent trade edition published on his actual date of birth, March 26th. "Bravado" is the third poem in Frost's "Five Nocturnes," which was first published in his 1947 collection of poetry, Steeple Bush. Notably, this inscribed holograph of "Bravado" is dated 1946 - a year prior to its first published appearance. The five short poems contained in "Five Nocturnes" are: "I. The Night Light," "II. Were I in Trouble," "III. Bravado," "IV. On Making Certain Anything Has Happened," and "V. In the Long Night." In "Five Nocturnes," the speaker's nighttime ruminations are reminiscent of those found in other classic Frost poems like "Acquainted with the Night" and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening." Item #RF070