Item #JSW007 Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts. Jonathan Swift.
Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts
Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts
Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts
Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts

Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts

Price: $4,500.00

Hard Cover. London: Printed for Benj. Motte, 1726. First Edition. Very Good.

Illustrated with two maps in Volume I, and three maps and a diagram in Volume 2. Four parts in two volumes as issued. First edition, third issue (Teerink's "B" Edition), with frontispiece portrait of Gulliver in the second state (legend lettered around an oval frame, and vertical chain lines), as usual. This is the third of three editions of Gulliver's Travels printed in the same year - the first "A" published October 27th, "AA" published in November, and this "B" issue published in December. Octavo. Finely bound in 19th century speckled calf by Robson & Kerslake, with boards triple-ruled in gilt with gilt decorations in corners, five raised bands to spines, ruled, lettered, and decorated in gilt, red and dark blue leather labels to spines, red marbled endpapers, gilt turn-ins, top edge gilt, and yellow edges. Very good set, with some repair to hinges, light wear to edges and corners, and some light spotting to pages. Overall, a gorgeous example of Swift's greatest satire. Teerink-Scouten 291. Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, or Gulliver's Travels, as it has come to be known, begins when the fictional traveler Lemuel Gulliver finds himself prisoner on the island of Lilliput, held captive by a race of people less than six inches tall. The story continues through a series of similarly outrageous adventures, divided into four parts that each take place over a period of about four years. First published in 1726, Gulliver's Travels is one of the first books to take the form of the modern novel, and uses satire to express critical views on government, religion, and patriarchy. Notably, it has been adapted for television, film, and radio, and continues to be referenced throughout English literature. Item #JSW007