Darlinghissima: Letters to a Friend. Natalia Danesi Murray, Janet Flanner.
Darlinghissima: Letters to a Friend
Darlinghissima: Letters to a Friend
Darlinghissima: Letters to a Friend

Darlinghissima: Letters to a Friend

New York: Random House, 1985. First Edition. Near Fine / Dust Jacket Included.


First edition, first printing. Signed and inscribed by Danesi Murray in Italian: "Al caro Floriano, in nome della nostra vecchia amicizia, con effetto, Natalia D. M." ("To dear Floriano, in the name of our old friendship with feeling, Natalia D. M.") Publisher's original burnt orange cloth, spine lettered in gilt; dust jacket featuring photographs of Flanner and Danesi Murray; book near fine, with crease to spine cloth, upper cover with small spot and top corner bumped; unclipped dust jacket near fine, with faint scratch to rear panel, small closed tear on front panel. Darlinghissima: Letters to a Friend is a collection of letters from Janet Flanner to her long-time lover and friend Natalia Danesi Murray. Flanner and Danesi Murray maintained their long-distance relationship through letter writing while Flanner lived in Paris and served as The New Yorker's Paris correspondent. The letters span from 1944 to 1975 and illustrate the two women's deep love for one another and serve as a window into Flanner's inner life, illuminating everything from her self-doubt to her illustrious career. The book is titled after Flanner's invented term of endearment for her lover, a combination of "darling" and the Italian superlative suffix. The pair were reunited in 1975 when Flanner moved back to the United States to live out her final years. Danesi Murray cared for Flanner till her death in 1978. Natalia Danesi Murray inscribed this book in Italian for Floriano Vecchi, an Italian artist and printer. After moving to New York, Vecchi founded the Tiber Press and the literary magazine Folder; his work publishing art and poetry put him in the company of Frank O'Hara, Paul Cadmus, and Georgia O'Keeffe. His most fruitful collaboration occurred when Tiber screen printed a drawing of a dollar bill for Andy Warhol. Under Vecchi's influence, Warhol introduced the technique of screen printing to his studio, and it became his preferred method of making art from then on.


Item #JF003

Price: $50.00