Death in the Afternoon. Ernest Hemingway.

Death in the Afternoon

Hard Cover. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1932. First Edition. Near Fine.


First edition, first printing. Original publisher's cloth, lettered in gilt; in a supplied dust jacket with light toning and chipping to extremities. Presentation copy signed and inscribed by Hemingway to close friend, Guy Hickock: "To Guy, or Monsieur Tripas, / with much affection, / Ernest". Some light rubbing to the extremities and some stains to the rear cover, else very good. Guy Hickock was an American journalist who began working for the Brooklyn Eagle in 1914, then a major publication. After World War I, Hickock moved to France, where he opened up a Paris bureau for the Eagle in 1918. The Paris center also served as a travel hub for Americans in Paris, which is likely where Hickock met Ernest Hemingway. Despite Hickock being over a decade Hemingway's senior, the two were close friends in the 1920's, with Hickock assisting Hemingway as he worked in Paris and traveled abroad. In 1927, the two traveled together to Italy, a trip which would become the basis for Hemingway's short story "Che Ti Dice La Patria?" as well as an inspiration for Hickock's own journal articles. The Hemingway Review 25. Death in the Afternoon is Hemingway's non-fiction book about the sport of bull-fighting, which ranges from technical descriptions of the art of the sport to philosophical conjectures about people who are interested in or partake in bull-fighting. Hemingway first became interested in bull-fighting after attending the Festival of San Fermínin in Pamplona, Spain in 1923, and became a lifelong aficionado. This technical text is enlivened by Hemingway's clear passion for the sport and keen understanding of its nuances. Although Death in the Afternoon is the author's first full book-length non-fiction piece, Hemingway's love for bull-fighting can also be seen in his 1926 novel The Sun Also Rises.


Item #EH117

Price: $20,000.00

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