The Romanes Lecture 1922: The Theory of Relativity and its Influence on Scientific Thought. By Arthur Stanley Eddington M.A., F.R.S. Plumian Professor of Astronomy, Cambridge, President of the Royal Astronomical Society, Delivered in the Sheldonian Theatr. Arthur Stanley Eddington.

The Romanes Lecture 1922: The Theory of Relativity and its Influence on Scientific Thought. By Arthur Stanley Eddington M.A., F.R.S. Plumian Professor of Astronomy, Cambridge, President of the Royal Astronomical Society, Delivered in the Sheldonian Theatr

Soft Cover. Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1922. Very Good.


First edition. Publisher's blue paper wrappers, printed in dark blue. A very good or better copy, wrappers with wear and creasing to extremities, some toning and a few tiny areas of loss to spine, interior very clean and bright. This lecture by the English astronomer and physicist Arthur Stanley Eddington covers the theory of relativity that had been recently developed by the German physicist Albert Einstein. One of the foremost British scientists in the astronomical physics field, Eddington was the first to bring Einstein's ideas to popularity in Great Britain, interpreting the German researcher's ideas for British audiences. In 1919, his observations of the theory of general relativity in a solar eclipse were some of the first confirmations of the theory. Created in 1891, the annual Romanes Lecture at Oxford University invites a prominent figure in arts, science, or literature to address students on relevant issues.


Item #ASED001

Price: $65.00